All information on this website is for informational purposes only and is not legal advice. Ninomiya Law, PLLC and Kent Ninomiya only provide legal advice to clients when there is a valid engagement agreement signed by both attorney and clients. The principal office of Ninomiya Law, PLLC is located in Round Rock, Texas. Ninomiya Law, PLLC is responsible for the content of this website.

keeping you and your family safe

​First of all, let me be clear that I am NOT saying that most or even a large number of social media problems can be solved by doing nothing. However, there are some situations where aggressive action in response to a social media problem can backfire. It is always prudent to consider whether your actions could make a social media problem worse.

​For example, if you are offended by a controversial social media post but it does not refer to you personally, aggressively responding to it could make you the target of those who support the post. You have made yourself a target even though you were not the subject of the initial post. 

The same can be true for social media posts that do impact you personally but nobody else is aware of the intrusion. Making a big deal about the issue can actually attract the attention you were trying to avoid. This has come to be known as the Streisand Effect for the way singer Barbara Streisand handled an Internet issue in 2003. 

That year 12,000 photographs were taken of the California coastline as part of an erosion documentation study. The pictures were posted on Pictopia.com. Image 3850 happened to be of Barbra Streisand's house. Nobody in the public realized it was her house until she filed a lawsuit for invasion of privacy. Prior to her lawsuit, the image was downloaded just six times, two of them by her own attorneys. In the month after filing the lawsuit, it was downloaded 420,000 times. Streisand was never able to suppress the photograph. Her lawsuit attracted attention to it and she was ordered to pay $155,567.04 for the defendant's legal fees in addition to her own. 

If Barbara Streisand had done nothing in this situation, it is likely that nobody would have ever realized that one of the 12,000 posted photographs was of her house. She also would have saved hundreds of thousands of dollars in legal fees. The bottom line is, consider whether actions you contemplate in a social media situation will help or harm you. Sometimes the best thing to do is nothing.

However, if doing nothing does not appear to be the best option consider a Media Response, Confrontation, or Legal Action.

do nothing